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FREE NY CDL INFO - 2018 Commercial Drivers License

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Commercial Drivers License

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New York CDL Road Test - Driving CDL Skills Test

The New York CDL Driving Road Test is the final of three skills tests. Fees - Locations - Procedures


CDL General Information
CDL Qualifications - Rules
CDL Classifications
2018 CDL Written Tests
2018 CDL Skills Tests
CDL Skills Training Options
Free CDL Manual (Handbook)

There are THREE parts to the New York CDL Skills Test

You must obtain a New York CLP (commercial learners permit) prior to taking your New York CDL skills test.

New York CDL On-Road Driving Test

New York cdl road test, road test, cdl skills test The New York CDL road test is conducted on street and requires the driver to demonstrate skill in normal traffic situations such as: turns; intersections; lane changes; stop/start; etc. The road test is described in Section 13 of the Free New York CDL Handbook (Commercial Driver's License Manual).

The three-part skills tests must be scheduled (often more than a week or two ahead). They are given either by a state tester or by a state approved third party tester. Depending on where you live, you will either have to provide a proper vehicle or one will be provided for you. This varies from state to state. Check your specific New York CDL Information for details.

Typical New York CDL Road Tests

The New York CDL Road test may include the recommended specified maneuvers listed below (this may vary by state and locality):
  • Four left and four right turns - Include turns at traffic lights, stop signs and uncontrolled intersections. Turns should range from easy to somewhat difficult for a heavy vehicle. A mix of types of intersections should be included.
  • Straight section of urban business street - The section should be one to two miles long, contain through intersections and intersections with traffic lights, and have moderate traffic density. Try to get a section where the driver can make lane changes along the route. The section should be one that lets you see how the driver copes with traffic in a typical business area.
  • One through intersection and two intersections where a stop has to be made - If possible, these intersections should be included in the urban section.
  • One railroad crossing - Try to get an uncontrolled crossing. The crossings should have enough sight distance for you to see if the driver makes search head movements when approaching each crossing. The driver's attempt to look left and right down the track will often be the only way you can tell if the driver noticed the crossing. If you do not have a railroad crossing in your area, do the following:
    • For bus and HAZMAT applicants, create a simulated railroad crossing. This will be on a lightly traveled section of the street or road that contains a landmark that you can point out to the driver, and tell the driver to treat as a railroad crossing. The landmark can be an intersection, an entrance to the road, or even a billboard. Instruct the driver to do whatever he or she would do at a real railway crossing.
    • For all other applications, simply add one extra through intersection to the route.
  • Curve, either to the left or to the right - Try to get a curve that is tight enough to produce noticeable off-tracking on a tractor-trailer.
  • Section of expressway or two-land rural or semi-rural road - You must have an expressway section if there is an expressway in or close to your testing area. The two-lane rural section may be used when there is no expressway available. The expressway section should be a four-lane controlled access highway such as an interstate. The section should start with a conventional ramp entrance and end with a conventional ramp exit. The section should be long enough for a heavy vehicle to do two lane changes during this section. The rural highway section should be at least two miles. Try to find a road that has at least a section with four lanes where lane changes can be made. In general, when you choose a section of rural road, look for something that gives driving challenges as close as possible to those found on an expressway.
  • Downgrade steep that is long enough to require gearing down and braking. A steep short hill is the next best choice if a longer grade cannot be found. Try to find a grade where it should be obvious to a driver approaching the grade that the grade will require proper downgrade driving precautions.
  • Simulated downgrade - Flat section of road where you can ask a driver to go through the motions of driving down a steep grade. The section should be about a quarter mile long, have little or no traffic, or have several lanes so a slow vehicle will not interfere with traffic. If the real downgrade on your route is likely to give a poorly prepared driver a problem, it is a good idea to locate the simulated grade so that it comes before the real grade.
  • Upgrade steep long enough to require gear changing to maintain speed. A steep, short hill is the next best choice if a long grade cannot be found. You may use the same grade for both the downgrade and the upgrade if it is hard to find steep grades in your area.
  • Downgrade for stopping where a vehicle can be safely stopped and parked for short period - The grade needs to be only steep enough to cause a vehicle to roll if the driver does not park properly. Remember that you only need a gentle slope to cause a heavy vehicle to roll.
  • Upgrade for stopping where a vehicle can be safely stopped and parked for a short period - Use the same grade as you need to.
  • One underpass, or low clearance, or a bridge - An underpass should have a posted clearance height and a bridge should have a posted weight limit. If you cannot find underpasses or bridges with posted limits, use ones that do not have posted limits. If you cannot find any low clearance or bridges, look for places that have signs a heavy vehicle driver should see (e.g., No Commercial Vehicles after 11 p.m. or Bridge with 10 Ton Weight Limit in 5 Miles).

Tips on passing the New York CDL Road Driving Test

  • Remember that this is not a speed race.
  • Use your mirrors! Don't cut off taffic.
  • Take the outer left hand turn lane if there are two provided.
  • Don't forget to use your turn signals.
  • Never hit a curb.
  • Maintain your composure and at least be able to act as if you're calm and confident.

Are YOU ready to get YOUR New York CDL?
Prepare for YOUR New York CDL Tests NOW . . .

In addition to the New York CDL (commercial driver's license) information found in the web site for New York and in the free New York CDL Handbook (which is quite boring and a bit confusing - and doesn't have a single question in it that is asked on the actual tests), the complete online New York CDL Practice Test prep program will prepare you to easily pass your New York CDL exams. It includes the following features . . .
  • Covers ALL Eight New York CDL written tests.
  • Covers ALL Three New York CDL skills tests.
  • 670 practice New York CDL test questions with actual answers.
  • Access to CDL videos
  • CDL study guide in both text and audio
  • CDL study Quick Reviews
  • Interactive online CDL Quizzes
  • and Much more!
May your new CAREER be prosperous!!!

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